80-20 Rule

80-20 Rule

20% of the projects generate 80% of the benefit. We see the Pareto Principle at play over and over again as we model NPD project portfolios with clients. Many times, 20% of the projects (i.e. the $'s) generate 80% of the benefit towards reaching an organization's objectives. This means that 80% of the projects fall on the “diminishing returns” part of the cost-benefit curve. Why still do them?

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Prioritize Public Policy

Prioritize Public Policy

In preparation for a meeting with the then new Mayor of Sacramento, Kevin Johnson, we developed the following decision-model example, responding to the question, "Which combination of initiatives generate the greatest value, in order to fulfill the goals of the new administration?" This is somewhat dated today, but the concepts are relevant to any policy decision making, regardless of the timing.

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Ask the Customer

Ask the Customer

Based on our research work with best-practice teams we’ve developed a 5-step voice-of-the-customer, or “VOC” process for aligning customer requirements with product requirements in order to determine what customers value most. The customer’s requirements are their “wants” and the product requirements are “how” you will fulfill those wants with your product or service.

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Planning Large Programs

Planning Large Programs

An abstract introduction to the methodology we’ve developed to manage large programs over the past 20 years, through hundreds of client experiences around the world--from the $6B Saturn program at GM to multi-million & billion dollar solar and semiconductor fabs. They all share a common foundation in our best practice research into how teams deliver the right “thing” at the right time.

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Production Versus Project Thinking

Production Versus Project Thinking

We’ve observed two distinct types of thinking, the process mindset associated with producing many things requiring an understanding of volume, yield, and quality--and then a second thought process associated with projects; which have a start and finish and where something is created... when done the team moves on. However, with the former, the team stays and continuously improves it.

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Being Roughly Right... When to Act

Being Roughly Right... When to Act

Being roughly rightis a key characteristic of the high performerswe’ve worked with over the past 20 years. They’ve made the conscious trade-off between having all the information to reduce risk versus being roughly right with a decision which is made sooner, and then using the time gained to refine the decision through a continuous improvement process.

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